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Lender and AMC revision requests

Lender/AMC revision requests
By Steve Costello
Source: AppraisalPort monthly newsletter

My comment:  www.appraisalport.com  recently redid their web site and somehow their surveys got put on another page. Now, they are back. AppraisalPort has my Most Favorite Appraisal Surveys!! The current poll is about what measuring device appraisers use. Be sure to vote!! Their poll responses were typically very high, 4,000 to 6,000 responses.

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Full article below:

First, I am glad to report that the poll is back up and running on the AppraisalPort homepage. It was down for a few weeks during the transition to the new version, but you can now find it by either scrolling down a bit or by just clicking on the button that says “Weekly Poll” on the right side of the screen.

This month, I want to discuss a couple of recent polls related to lender/AMC revision requests. First we asked: “Compared to a year ago, my lender/AMC revision requests have…?” Out of the 5019 responses, nearly 40 percent went with the answer “Stayed about the same.” Unfortunately the second most popular answer of “Increased significantly,” which took 21 percent of the vote and was followed closely by “Increased somewhat” with 19 percent. These were followed by the responses of “Decreased somewhat” pulling 13 percent of the vote and finally, “Decreased significantly” with a 7 percent share. There are two ways we can look at this data: Taking a negative view, 40 percent of the appraisers are experiencing some kind of increase in revision requests. That is a big number, but looking on the positive side that means that the other 60 percent have either stayed at the same level or have experienced a decrease in revision requests.

In the second poll we asked: “On average, how much time do you spend making and delivering requested revisions on any given appraisal?” We had a total of 4870 responses to this poll. Nearly half (48%) of those chose the response of “10-30 minutes.” This would seem about right for most minor to moderate revisions. Many must be making pretty minor revisions because the second most popular response with 24 percent of the vote was “Under 10 minutes”. Another 18 percent are having to take a bit more time and went with the choice of “31-60 minutes.” A smaller group of 7 percent is having to invest some real time to make the revisions and picked the response of “Over an hour.” The final 3 percent selected the answer of “I don’t make revisions.” I’m not sure if that means they are doing an amazing job on every report and never get a request or if they just refuse to do any revisions!

My comment: these results are somewhat similar to the recent Valuation Review survey results. I keep hearing lots of complaints about revision request hassles. It is good that it seems to be stablizing. Interesting results. I hardly ever have revision requests from my estate clients, except when I have a typo on the address or client name ;> I really hate getting reviewed!! Well… maybe it would be okay if it is an experienced local appraiser who knows all about my market!! I have always wondered why lender appraisals have been regularly reviewed. I don’t know of any other profession where someone else reviews so many reports that are done. I really think this is why appraisers are so negative about other appraisers’ work. I can’t remember if I took the poll… I often don’t because I don’t do any lender work and it sorta skews the results…

What do you think? Post your comments below!!

Appraisal Today newsletter

How to stem appraiser "low tide"

By Alan Hummel, Chief Appraiser Forsythe Appraisal

Excerpt:

The topic may seem peculiar at a time when mortgage originations are down from the heyday of the early 2000s, but if the issue isn’t addressed now, a shortage of qualified residential appraisers could have a dampening effect on the mortgage market at precisely the moment when it is trying to regain its past vibrancy.

The decline in the numbers of appraisers entering the profession can be attributed to many factors including (but not limited to): qualifications and licensing requirements, the economics involved in training, and unwillingness on the part of some financial institutions to allow trainee appraisers to perform services. The most significant obstacle for many trainee appraisers is completing the 2,500 hours of required experience to achieve Certified Residential status, after the education component has been completed.

My comment: The only answer is for lenders to allow trainees to “sign on their own”.Hummel proposes a training program. But, I don’t see this happening on a large scale.  Since Fannie and Freddie started loan securitization in the 1970s, the volume of appraisals needed has been very, very cyclical. Before licensing, most appraisers were employees of lenders. Lenders solved the problem by hiring armies of trainees during boom times and then laying them off when volume dropped. Few appraisers are employees of lenders now. Fee appraisers have been expected to train new appraisers. Lenders paid them a salary and experienced salaried appraisers were the supervisors. But, fee appraisers are not set up for it – no time, minimal supervisor training, little economic incentive, etc.

Read the full article at:
http://www.housingwire.com/articles/31233-how-to-stem-appraiser-low-tide

Appraisal Today newsletter

$200 appraisal fees – appraisers removed for refusing low fees!!

Blacklisted for Refusing Low Fees
Source: WorkingRE

Excerpt:
Dawson (quoted under an alias because she fears retaliation), tells a story that many appraisers can relate to. She says she was blacklisted for requesting what should be protected under law-her right to customary and reasonable fees. Dawson is different because instead of being secretly blacklisted and left to wonder why she stopped receiving orders after requesting a fee increase on an assignment, she was formally removed from an AMC’s panel after insisting that the AMC’s fee was not customary and reasonable…

Recently, however, her client began using an AMC to manage the appraisal process. After an 18-year relationship with a quality client, Dawson found herself dealing with an AMC that wanted to pay her considerably less than her standard fee. Dawson says the AMC wanted to pay her $290 for an appraisal. “For five years my standard fee with my client was $375. They decide to go through an AMC and now I’m expected to accept a fee of $290 for the same work,” says Dawson.

She discussed her concerns multiple times via telephone with the AMC. “I told them that I would not accept a fee of $290 for the same appraisal that my client had previously paid me $375 for. Their fees are unprofessional and not in the spirit of Dodd-Frank. One girl just laughed at me on the phone because I wouldn’t take $290. She told me they didn’t need me because there are plenty of other appraisers who will do it,” says Dawson.

Dawson was removed from the fee panel for “Unprofessional Conduct – Derogatory responses to communication from Nationwide Appraisal Network,” according to a document supplied to Working RE . Dawson says it was her pushback on fees that led to her removal, which followed her sending the AMC an email pointing out that the C&R fee established between her and her client was $375, and that the fee offered by the AMC was neither customary nor reasonable. The return letter from the AMC concludes: “Due to the issues we have experienced with your conduct… you are hereby notified that you are being removed from our approved appraiser list.”

http://www.workingre.com/blacklisted-refusing-low-fees-2/

My comment: Appraisers are getting letters or emails that they are being removed from AMC lists because they are turning down low fees. I am also hearing about desperate AMCs who can’t find anyone to work for their low fees. This often happens in rural areas with few appraisers. Low fees can be ok in nearby conforming tracts but go rapidly go downhill from there. I have no idea who will be doing appraisals as more and more appraisers are turning down the low fees.

I am also hearing some AMCs are raising fees. Maybe they have figured out that one fee for an entire state often does not work well!!

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$200 Appraisals – Poor Business Decisions for the Appraiser AND Lender
By Joanna Condé
Source Arizona Association of Real Estate Appraisers

Excerpt:
As many of us fight for customary and reasonable fees of $350 or more, some of our appraisal brothers and sisters are still taking the $200 appraisal and not only hurting the cause for the rest of us, but doing something that will eventually, if it hasn’t already, hurt themselves.

… there are many AMCs that pay customary and reasonable fees of $350 and more, that give five business days to do the report, and that will pay more if the properties are complex, in an area that requires more work and research, and will allow more time if there are reasons…

So why would anyone accept a fee below $300, let alone in the $200 range. I can only attribute it to not thinking it through.
Below are the reality checks as I see it.

Reality Check – $: The net from doing one $350 appraisal is about the same or even more than doing two $200 appraisals…

Reality Check – Time: There is twice as much time spent on two appraisals as there is on one. So, the appraiser taking the $200 appraisal spends twice as much time for the same money unless corners are cut. If an appraiser tells me he doesn’t do the same amount of work for the $200 appraisal as he would for the $350, then there is no other choice but to believe he is: a) cutting corners, or b) not doing a full report and providing the information necessary for a credible report, i.e. USPAP compliant. Not smart. The issue becomes not “if” you get reported, but “when” you get reported.

Reality Check – Liability: It seems apparent to me that the same lenders that have the highest foreclosure rates are also the lenders that work through AMCs that pay low appraisal fees and ask for short turn around times…

To Lenders: For those lenders that do not inquire of the AMCs they use what they pay their appraisers, and the time they give them to complete the report, shame on them. They are putting their own company at risk as well the borrower. Why?
The best appraisers won’t work for cut-rate fees. They know the quality of their work and they charge for it. Those appraisers who work for low fees usually produce low quality. “You get what you pay for.”

Low quality appraisals put the lender at a higher risk of making a bad loan.Isn’t it time ALL appraisers and lenders realized that!

Cheap is Expensive!

My comment: well written. Not just a lot of whining and complaining. Explains why it is important to the lender.

CLICK HERE TO READ WHAT OTHER APPRAISERS SAY ABOUT LOW FEES AND POST YOUR COMMENTS ON MY BLOG

Read the full commentary at:
http://appraisersblogs.com/appraisal/the-folly-of-the-200-dollar-appraisal/

 

Appraisal Today newsletter

AMCs – questions about value and revision requests – Poll

Appraiser Poll results
www.Appraisalport.com

How often, if ever, do your lender/AMC clients question your opinion of value? 8/4/14
Almost every report 108 votes 2%
1 out of 10 reports 327 votes 6%
1 out of 20 reports 247 votes 5%
1 out of 30 reports 333 votes 6%
Almost never 3,535 votes 68%
My opinion of value has never been questioned 635 votes 12%

Total Votes: 5,185

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Compared to a year ago, my lender/AMC revision requests have:
7/28/14

Increased significantly 1,053 votes 21%
Increased somewhat 971 votes 19%
Stayed about the same 1,981 votes 39%
Decreased somewhat 661 votes 13%
Decreased significantly 353 votes 7%

Total Votes: 5,019

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On average, how much time do you spend making and delivering requested revisions on any given appraisal? 8/14/14

Under 10 minutes 1,163 votes 24%
10 – 30 minutes 2,323 votes 48%
31 – 60 minutes 875 votes 18%
Over an hour 366 votes 8%
I don’t make revisions 141 votes 3%

Total Votes: 4,868

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My comment: Good to see that there are not many valuation hassles but, of course, there should be none since that is what AMCs are supposed to do – no valuation pressures!! Interesting revision results, since many appraisers complain they spend lots of time responding to them – 72% are 30 minutes or less. My favorite is No revisions, but only 3%.

Appraisal Today newsletter

Appraiser-AMC symbiosis?? Not!!!

An Evolving Symbiotic Relationship Between AMCs and Appraisers  ????
Monday, August 11, 2014, posted on Appraisal Buzz
Scott Pickell – vice president and chief appraiser at LRES

A few quotes:

“As a former appraiser with nearly 30 years of experience and now an executive working at an AMC, I have observed a true evolution in the way appraisers and AMCs work together. The relationship between AMCs and appraisers started off unsteadily but has improved over the years. It has now reached a point of mutual respect.“

“When working as an appraiser, I recall some AMCs treated me as though I was a rookie in the industry despite my 20 years in the field at the time. There was no reason for that. When AMCs treat appraisers with the respect they deserve, appraisers will return that respect and produce better work.“

My comments: Maybe Pickell’s AMC respects appraisers but the way appraisers are treated by most AMCs does not indicate any respect.

Appraising in the U.S. started during the Great Depression when lenders needed appraisals for foreclosures. Until the 1990s, when mortgage brokers took over, lenders somehow managed their appraisals without armies of telephone calls for updates, 10+ page engagement letters, sending broadcast emails trying to get the lowest fees, etc. etc.

Somehow, since HVCC, appraisers are managed as if they were children, who have to be prodded incessantly and corrected to do their appraisals “right” to ever increasing requirements.

Appraisers are seen as barely competent and unreliable, who have to be heavily managed. But, all of this costs a lot of money, as compared with the old lender management of appraisers. Of course, mortgage broker management cost very little, if anything. Who pays for it today? Appraisers and borrowers.

The same “barely competent” appraisers are increasing required to provide lots of time consuming information and analyses which often do not contribute to the accuracy or reliability of their opinions of value.

Residential appraisers are often required to “support” all their adjustments. That’s fine if you are doing a conforming tract home. If not, it all goes downhill fast. What’s my answer? Turn down as much as possible anything not a conforming tract home. Or, change your geographic area to one that has a lot of tract homes. Working for AMCs with less hassle can help, but scope creep seems to be affecting all lenders.

Few residential appraisers are willing to do non-lender work. Learn how to do it, including marketing. I have special reports that can tell you about how it differs from non-lender work, and how to get work. This will reduce some of your lender dependency. See my ad above.

FYI, I have a Certified General license. I do a lot of 5+ unit apartment properties. They are easier than 2-4 units and I get much, much higher fees. There are few appraisers who do them in my area. Cert residential are not licensed for it and local commercial appraisers don’t like to do them as they prefer commercial and industrial properties.

Very interesting comment posted on an appraiser chat group by Charles Baker, SRA: (editor addition: A more appropriate comment by Pickell would be) “It’s my job to maximize profits for the company. If you wish to participate as a contractor that’s your choice. But make no mistake, our job is to service the client, reduce costs, boost our bottom line and reward our principals and shareholders. You may wish to participate in those profits by contacting our investor relations department, but don’t expect to get rich as an appraiser. Thank you very much.” I really like this comment as it says what a corporate manager would view the situation.

Link to the full article. http://appraisalbuzz.com/buzz/features/an-evolving-symbiotic-relationship-between-amcs-and-appraisers#sthash.QH5TBFby.dpuf

Appraisal Today newsletter

How accurate is the reported square footage from the tax records in your primary service area?

How accurate is the reported square footage from the tax records in your primary service area?
3/10/14 poll – www.appraisalport.com
Poll Results
– Very accurate for most homes 869 votes – 16%
– Mostly accurate (about 75% of the time) 2495 votes – 55%
– Hit and miss (about 50% of the time). 1470 votes – 27%
– Not reliable (accurate less than 25% of the time). 475 votes – 9%
– The tax records do not usually show the square footage in my area. 127 votes – 2%
Total votes = 5,346
My comment: AMCs seem to be assuming that tax records are more reliable than appraisers’ measurements. WRONG!! I started appraising at an assessor’s office in 1975. We were no more accurate than any other appraisers and never thought that our square footages were exact.
I used to do a lot of relocation appraisals where 2 or 3 appraisers were hired to appraise the same property. Very, very seldom did the appraisers have the same square footage.
A few years ago, a local real estate agent asked me about an appraisal where the sketch did not match the house. Tax records sq.ft. was way off. The appraiser had “fudged” the dimensions to match public records.
Do many appraisers do this to avoid AMC hassles or they were taught to do this by their supervisors?
I have always looked at tax records sq.ft. as a cross check, but never assumed it was more accurate than my measured sq.ft. In some neighborhoods and cities they are accurate and are very unreliable in other areas as they often are not correct.

Appraisal Today newsletter

AMC fees – going down?

Poll Results – www.appraisalport.com  survey 11/4/13

Have you noticed any change in the fees being paid by AMC’s since the market has slowed?

– No, fees seem about the same as before. 2,618 votes 52%
– Yes, the fees seem to have increased slightly. 464 votes 9%
– Yes, the fees seem to have decreased slightly. 1,419 votes 28%
– Not sure 488 votes 9%
Total Votes: 4,989

My comment: I am forecasting declining AMCs fees because loans have dropped. Keep up with fee changes at www.appraisaladvisor.com  which is now free to all appraisers!!
I have lots of tips on getting higher AMCs in my AMC Special Report – $20 and FREE to paid subscribers!!
go to www.appraisalport.com to take the current survey.

Appraisal Today newsletter

StreetLinks AMC's new AppraiserPlus Program-paid on inspection, no micromanagement?

My comment: Hmmm… we will see what happens. Maybe too many appraisers took Streetlinks off their approved AMC list?

Full Streetlinks press release:

May 23, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — StreetLinks Lender Solutions(R) announced today the August 2013 launch of its AppraiserPlus(SM) program. AppraiserPlus(SM) significantly enhances the professional partnership between StreetLinks and appraisers by removing the traditional hurdles of micromanagement and post-completion appraiser payment cycles. StreetLinks’ lender partners will continue to benefit from exemplary quality and service levels, with the assurance that they will never be responsible for an AMC’s failure to pay the appraiser.

“I have said many times that we want to make a positive impact on our industry and to continuously make it better than it was when we entered. AppraiserPlus(SM) is consistent with that goal by providing measurable benefits to appraisers and lenders through real partnerships — not traditional vendor micromanagement,” said StreetLinks President, Tom Hurst. “This program allows appraisers to focus on running their businesses and brings back the days of “COD” style payment. This announcement is a year in the making and as an original founder of StreetLinks, this is the most exciting announcement of my career.”

For years, traditional AMCs have put all appraisers into a single bucket and micromanaged every aspect of the process, resulting in real or perceived nuisance calls, texts and emails that interfere with the appraiser’s productivity. While StreetLinks has never set appraisers’ fees and has remained loyal to exceptional appraisers, the company also approached each order with a standardized follow-up process. AppraiserPlus(SM) changes that trend by restoring the days when appraisers were trusted to run their businesses and provide great service and quality reports, in addition to receiving the majority of their payments at the inspection versus weeks or months later.

AppraiserPlus(SM) will limit or remove calls, text messages and emails to participating appraisers during the appraisal fulfillment process, thus allowing appraisers to spend their time inspecting properties, compiling data and writing appraisal reports. Appraisers will have the opportunity to remove nearly all follow-up questions, revisions and stipulations by completing a StreetLinks QX review prior to report delivery. Additionally, AppraiserPlus(SM) will generate ACH payments to appraisers the same day the property is inspected.

Appraisers accepted into the program agree to consistent and fair service metrics and quality control requirements. Hurst noted that this will also ensure lenders that the best, most qualified appraiser will be handling each report.

“We have spent years developing great partnerships with our clients and continue to see unprecedented growth and capture market share. This program will strengthen our partnerships with appraisers while driving additional value for our clients,” Hurst added. “With multiple AMCs recently closing their doors, some lenders have been put in a tough spot — including being left to pay millions in situations where the AMC collected the funds, but failed to pay the appraiser. AppraiserPlus(SM) mitigates such risk, making it a win for both appraisers and lenders.”

About StreetLinks

StreetLinks Lender Solutions provides innovative and comprehensive suite of valuation services and lending technology solutions to banks, lenders and other mortgage industry firms. StreetLinks’ commitment to quality and service, embodied by our partnership approach to clients and appraisers, continues to set us apart as the nation’s premier lending solutions partner. Our products and services are used by thousands of mortgage bankers and appraisers nationwide to simplify and improve everyday business operations. For more information, visit www.streetlinks.com/landing/AppraiserPlus.

Contact Information:

Tom Hurst

tom.hurst@streetlinks.com

317-215-8182

Link to streetlinks web site:
https://www.streetlinks.com/landing/AppraiserPlus

Appraisal Today newsletter

New AMC – 8 hour turn time!!

An AMC to Keep Pace With?
Q&A with Richard Johnson of Pacer AMC
April 1, 2013
Appraisal Buzz

BUZZ: How will you differentiate your company from the other 500 AMCs?

RICHARD: We have created a unique appraiser scorecard. We have an algorithm that measures the appraiser’s self esteem. We find appraisers who set a low fee, never complain when we are a slow pay, and love challenging assignments. We have no dress code. Appraisers just hate that.

We have spent a lot of time picking the best appraisers for our assignments. We call it dialing for dollars. We reward our processers based upon setting new lows.

Because we are the low cost provider we attract the very largest lenders in the US.. These large lenders too have an algorithm that includes input as to the cost of regulation. They have figured out the risk of penalties and fines is somewhere between slim and none. They have lobbyists to ensure that. We have hitched our star to their wagon.

BUZZ: What is this we have heard of your 8 hour Turn Times?

RICHARD: One of the ways we feel we can stay ahead of our competition is we have instituted an 8 hour turn time. We feel it shouldn’t be too hard to get all our appraisals done the same day they are assigned.

Of course we are not unreasonable though if a property is over 250 miles away we allow an extra 2 hours to submit your report.

BUZZ: With all the transparency, disclosures and Customary & Reasonable laws how do you get away with being the low cost provider?

RICHARD: It is really simple. We know our clients love AMCs because they get our services for free. It is the greatest business on the planet. The appraiser pays for the services for the lender. What a racket. We find appraisers who are willing to drive anywhere and do anything for an ungodly low fee.

We don’t worry about compliance because the appraiser signs an affidavit that certifies we have paid them a customary and reasonable fee. Have you seen the CFPB enforce any appraisal rules ? No of course not. Zero risk for lenders and AMCs.

My comment: be sure to click on the link and read the rest of the articled before you let your blood pressure go way up ;> It was published on April Fools Day!!

http://appraisalbuzz.com/an-amc-to-keep-pace-with

Appraisal Today newsletter

AMC Declares Bankruptcy: What Appraisers Need To Know About Bankruptcy

By Ramir Rodriguez

You received a letter in the mail informing you that your client has filed for .  It is this moment you realize that this bad news just became your problem.

Many of us are familiar with the recent bankruptcy filings of and its  bankruptcysubsidiary .  Peter Christensen, attorney and general counsel to LIA Administrators & Insurance Services, shared in his blog that the total unpaid fees to , agents, and brokers as listed in bankruptcy documents is $11,048,411.97!  This is a remarkable amount.  Evaluation Solutions’ bankruptcy documents accounted for $9,349,612.97 of the total amount and a separate filing of its subsidiary was for $1,698,799.

I Received A Notice… Now What?

If you received a notice regarding Evaluation Solutions/ES ’ (I will refer to them as ES) bankruptcy you may be wondering what the next step is to try and recover money owed to you.  Yes, a client’s bankruptcy can be costly for you, but most importantly, not adhering to the rules of the bankruptcy process can cost you significantly more.

Knowing the types of bankruptcy, how to play by the rules, and what you can (or can’t do) will help you understand the scope of your problem and ensure you don’t get in trouble.

Types of Bankruptcy

There are lots of information you can gather from the bankruptcy notice from ES to help you understand the nature of this problem.  But first you must recognize the type of bankruptcy ES is filing.

Chapter 7 – This type of bankruptcy is the liquidation of remaining assets to distribute among its creditors.

Chapter 11 – This a financial reorganization of a business, which allows your client to function while they follow court ordered debt repayment plans.

Chapter 13 – Similar to Chapter 11, but rather than a business filing bankruptcy it is the individual reorganizing and following a debt repayment plan.

Ideally, it’s more favorable on your end if your client files for either Chapter 11 or 13.  These types of bankruptcy give your client a breather until they figure out how to repay.

If your client however files for Chapter 7, which is what ES filed, not only will your chances of getting paid be reduced, but also you may be waiting a long time (even years) for this type of case to be completed.

Take A Number

At this point you are probably frustrated and would like to call someone to attempt to collect your money.  Stop right there!  Your actions can get you in deep waters.  If you attempt to make phone calls to ES’s accounting department, send nasty letters, or try to file a lien (which some appraisers have done in other instances and is not recommended), you will face penalties.

Assuming you do get some money owed to you, you will have to wait in line.  This is the second item you must understand.  Here’s the payment order:

  1. Lawyers, administrative expenses, and other professional services that are involved pulling hairwith the work of filing the bankruptcy.
  2. Secured claims, including mortgage holders.
  3. Priority claims, including wages and taxes.
  4. Unsecured claims, which is where you as an may be categorized.
  5. Equity claims, including stockholders.

So curb your frustration because all you can do at this point is wait.

What Can You Do While You Wait

Sure you have to wait for ES’s bankruptcy process to take its course, but there are some things you can do in the interim.  Since this case can drag for a long period of time, you can do the following:

  1. Consult with your CPA about taking a deduction on your taxes for the bad debt.  If you manage to receive some money owed to you after the bankruptcy case is settled you can claim it as income at that time.  See your accountant for more details.
  2. It does not apply in this case, but if you have a future instance where your client files for Chapter 11 or 13 and wants to continue a working relationship, it may be to your advantage.  Of course your immediate reaction is to quickly say “no way!”, but understand that Chapter 11 and 13 require debtors to stay current on all accounts moving forward.  This means you can add a fee to your to recover what was lost, stricter payment time frames, and maybe exclusivity as other appraisers may not take another chance.  Keep in mind that the best way to reduce or eliminate risks is to get paid up front.

 Improve And Move On

Now that you’re somewhat familiar with the types of bankruptcy, payment pecking order, and what you may be able to do as the bankruptcy takes its course, it is important prepare for the future.  This means assessing your and how to prevent this problem from happening again.

First, create a process on how to screen new clients by knowing their payment history.  There are many tools and resources you can use online that are free or for a small fee.  Second, improve your accounts receivable aging management procedures.  Just because they are still “current” doesn’t mean it does not require all of your attention.  Current receivables can quickly turn into problems if you don’t pay attention.  Last but not least, be persistent and tough but professional with your collections.

If you have an AMC bill in your state, read it and educate yourself on how it can help your appraisal business.  There are sections in most AMC bills that require AMCs to pay by a certain time frame.  For example, Texas AMC bill requires AMCs to pay appraisers within 60 days.

Also consider resources available to you such as your receivables where the risk of non-payment is transferred to the company.  In this case, you can get paid quickly without the responsibility of collecting and liability of non-payments.

No small business is immune to the unexpected, but you can certainly minimize you risks as work towards a successful 2013.

Guest blogger:  Ramir Rodriguez  represents Treasure  Valley Factors
in Fruitland, Idaho. He has  helped real estate  appraisers
understand how factoring can can help their business since 2009.
For more questions about factoring ,
please  email him at rrodriguez@treasurevalleyfactors.com
or visit his blog Factoring Helps or
website www.treasurevalleyfactors.com.
Twitter: @RamirRodriguez
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