Appraising Factory-Built Houses

Factory-Built Houses: Types, Benefits, and Tips for Appraisers

By Dan Bradley

Excerpts: Factory-built houses are an important, yet often overlooked, part of the American housing market. Approximately 10% to 12% of new housing starts in the United States are factory-built. There are several advantages to building a house in a factory. For example, certain houses can be constructed for 50% less than a similar-sized site-built home, making quality housing more affordable for thousands of Americans. As an appraiser, your knowledge of factory-built housing is key to a credible appraisal.

This article examines several different types of factory-built houses, their five main advantages, and tips for appraising them.

Factory-built house is a term that refers generally to a number of house types that are constructed or fabricated, at least in part, off site. The prefabricated components are transported to the site and finished or reassembled there. By contrast, site-built, or “stick-built,” homes are put together at the building site from thousands of individual pieces (e.g., studs, nails, sheets of drywall, shingles, wires, pipes, electrical outlet boxes).

For appraisers, understanding the specific type of factory-built house you’re dealing with is key. It tells you which building codes apply, gives you clues about the construction process, and impacts how you approach the valuation.

Factory-built homes include:

  •   Mobile homes
  •   Manufactured homes
  •   Modular homes
  •   Panelized homes
  •   Pre-cut or kit homes

To read more, Click Here

My comments: This is worth reading, especially if you appraise these types of homes. It provides very good, understandable explanations, including identifying the types. For example, GSEs will not purchase or securitize a mortgage on a mobile home manufactured before June 15, 1976. Likewise, HUD will not issue FHA mortgage insurance on a pre-1976 mobile home.

I work in an urban/suburban area, mostly built up, and have appraised very few of these homes. However, they are definitely more affordable housing, which is a very hot topic now.

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I Can’t Believe I Just Bought a $5M Mobile Home’: A Look Inside 5 of America’s Most Lavish Trailer Parks

Just for Fun!

Excerpts: Multimillion-dollar price tags usually come attached to massive mansions or luxury condos—but now, it’s becoming more common to find them in mobile home parks in enviable locations.

But these aren’t just any trailer parks, as they’re more commonly known. For one, they usually sit on prime real estate. And the neighbors? They’re traditionally billionaires or A-list celebrities.

Prices in some of these parks can generally range from $1.5 million to more than $6 million, but that hasn’t put off buyers with that type of cash to spare.

Arguably, the most famous trailer park in America is Paradise Cove in Malibu. Here, celebrities “slum it” in mobile homes to be close to some of the most expensive real estate in the world.

In 2019, fashion maven Betsey Johnson sold her small pink house here for $1.9 million; in 2018, former “Baywatch” babe Pamela Anderson unloaded her trailer for $1.75 million; and in 2016, songbird Stevie Nicks sold hers for $5.3 million.

To read more and see the photos, Click Here

My comment: I had to include this fun article related to the article above

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Appraisers Riding the Waves of Up and Down Mortgage Rates

Appraisal Business Tips 

Humor for Appraisers

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NOTE: Please scroll down to read the other topics in this long blog post seller concessions, all cash sales, liability, new fee survey, unusual homes, mortgage origination stats, etc

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Low Appraisal Fees in 2024

CFPB Crackdown: Unfair Practices Hurting Consumers

This includes Appraisal payments to appraisers by AMCs

by Josh Tucker, June 5, 2024

Comments must be received on or before August 2, 2024

Excerpts: As we all know many AMCs are not paying Customary & Reasonable fee as required by TILA. They have consistently pushed down the pay of Appraisers while making undisclosed profit off consumers and prioritizing cheapest and fastest over quality and competency. The CFPB has been in communication with individuals behind the scenes and are concerned with what has been shown enough to include AMCs in their data collection process.

Now is the time to send them everything we have. To drive legitimate change, we must encourage as many appraisers as possible to submit all relevant information to the contact details provided below.

CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU

[Docket No. CFPB-2024-0021] NOTE: USE THIS LINK TO READ THE DOCUMENT AND THIS NAME TO USE THE COMMENTS PORTAL BELOW.

Request for Information Regarding Fees Imposed in Residential Mortgage Transactions AGENCY: Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments identified by Docket No. CFPB-2024-0021, by any of the following methods:

Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov . Follow the instructions for submitting comments. NOTE: THE SEARCH WAS NOT WORKING ON JUNE 6. MAY WORK LATER. CAN USE EMAIL.

Email: 2024-RFI-ResidentialMortgageFees@CFPB.gov. Include Docket No. CFPB-2024-0021 in the subject line of the message.

Mail / Hand Delivery / Courier: Comment Intake —Residential Mortgage Fees Assessment, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, 1700 G Street NW, Washington, DC 20552.

To read more, Click Here

My comments: DO SOMETHING. YOUR VOICE MATTERS. Let CFPB know about the amount of AMC fees for appraisers, plus other problems. In my opinion, AMCs are ruining residential lender appraising. I have never worked for an AMC, but I’ve been appraising for almost 50 years and understand the problems.

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Appraisal Fees & Value: Lessons from Picasso & Steinmetz

By “Apex Appraiser” June 3, 2024

The Appraisal Institute has been a source of frustration and criticism within the appraisal profession for quite some time. I must admit that I have also expressed my dissatisfaction with them. Nevertheless, I must acknowledge that the new CEO, Cindy Chance, appears to be a positive change and is making some valuable points about our profession from her new position. In particular, she recently discussed appraisal fees in a piece she wrote.

In this excerpt, she shares two stories that provide valuable insights. These stories, one involving art and the other science, highlight the fact that appraising is a combination of both.

First is the story about a young woman who encountered Pablo Picasso one spring day, in a park, sketching. She begged him to sketch her. He graciously agreed, and following a few moments of study and drawing, handed her a sketch of herself. When she asked what she owed him, Picasso answered “$5,000 madam.” “But it only took you five minutes.” “No, madam, it took me my whole life.”

To read more, plus many appraiser comments, Click Here

My comments: Worth reading, plus the appraisers comments. I have been following CEO Cyndi Chance since she started working for AI. It’s definitely a “breath of fresh air” for the AI!

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Appraisers Riding the Waves of Up and Down Mortgage Rates

Appraisal Business Tips 

Humor for Appraisers

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NOTE: Please scroll down to read the other topics in this long blog post on state appraisal boards, liability, appraiser insurance, price per sq.ft. up 50%, sea level rise, unusual homes, mortgage origination stats, etc

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What Are Fannie’s New Appraisal Online Formats?

Fannie’s New Appraisal Online Formats

By Brent Owen

Excerpts:

To Be Or Not To Be (a form), That Is The Question

The first thing to notice is that the ‘form’ isn’t really a form anymore. It is more of a complex decision tree or flow chart, where ‘yes/no’ questions trigger new sections and required data and supplements. For instance, answering ‘yes’ to a question about noted deficiencies will create a new section where details are needed regarding the deficiency which include further questions about whether or not repair is required and if so, the estimated costs of those repairs and section to provide a photo of the deficiency. All of that is integrated into the URAR itself. It is through the use of this decision tree model that the GSEs are able to use the same ‘form’ for almost any residential property type conceivable.

The Never-ending Story

It is also apparent that the report will be far longer than its predecessor. Appendix D-1 contains a sample URAR of a simple single family residence with no site value, cost approach, or income approach, with only 3 sales and very limited commentary and no additional addenda (with photos, maps, and graphs integrated into the URAR). The report was 21 pages, and would still be at least double the length of the current URAR without the integrated photos, map, and graphs.

That in and of itself isn’t necessarily a problem. After all, my typical reports are more than 40 pages long. It’s not the length of the report which is of ultimate importance, it is the time necessary to develop the appraisal that is key. My sense so far is that there will be some additional time necessary (beyond the expected additional time necessary to become proficient with the new format and associated technology).

To read more plus appraiser comments, click here

My comments: Read this article! A good analysis in one location. I have read lots of very short comments, but this one is much longer. Unfortunately, Fannie has not provided separate information for appraisers. The announcement included many pages as it was for everyone: appraisers, forms vendors, lenders, AMCs, etc., with lots of very detailed information.

Appraisers – The Past and The Future

Appraisal Business Tips 

Humor for Appraisers

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NOTE: Please scroll down to read the other topics in this long blog post on Appraisal Institute President, non-lender appraisals, Changing state appraisal laws, Fannie modernization, unusual homes, mortgage origination stats, etc.

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2021 Appraiser Fee Survey

2021 Appraiser Fee Survey

By Isaac Peck
Excerpt: The 2021 Appraiser Fee Survey includes 365 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA), as defined by the U. S. Census Bureau, with rural areas included by state. The survey includes eight different appraisal products, including reviews and FHA appraisals, and addresses turn times, to offer insight into that controversial topic by area.
To check out the very detailed report for your MSA, click here
My comments: Lots of info by MSA! I got this info Wednesday and did not have time to look at it in detail.
Raise Your Fees, especially if working for AMCs!! Before AMC broadcast bids looking for the lowest fee, appraisal fees did not change much when volume changed. Since 1986 direct lender fees went up gradually. In my area, fees were about $250 in 1986 for SFR. Now fees have gone up to about $450 – $550 for regular long-time lender clients (and local AMCs). National AMCs are not loyal. Direct lenders can be loyal.
Fascinating and very comprehensive results by state and MSAs. I hear a lot about lenders and borrowers complaining about high appraisal fees. But in my area fees are not that high per the survey. I hear regularly about desperate AMCs who will pay $1,000 or more for appraisals. Appraisers are deluged with AMC appraisal requests, which are often deleted unopened of course. I also hear that sometimes the fee to the appraiser is much lower than the AMC fee.

Appraisal Business Tips 

Humor for Appraisers

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To read more of this long blog post with many topics, click Read More Below!!

NOTE: Please scroll down to read the other topics in this long blog post on unusual homes, bias, fees, non-lender appraisals, UAD, Fannie Update, mortgage origination stats, etc.

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New sewer line increases value for appraisals?

My new sewer line adds huge value, right?

January 19, 2021, By Ryan Lundquist

Excerpt: A new sewer line. That’s what 2020 gave my family as a parting gift before the year closed. Yep, just before Christmas, we had to replace our entire line at a whopping $13,688. I know that sounds crazy expensive, but we had four separate bids and went with the most reasonable one. In part it was so pricey because we had one hundred feet of the line under eighty feet of concrete.

The good news is my house is worth $13,688 more now, right?

To read more plus lots of appraiser comments click here

What to Do When Your Appraisal Is Under Review(Opens in a new browser tab)

Appraisal Business Tips 

Humor for Appraisers

Covid-19 Residential Appraisers Tips on Staying Safe

For Covid Updates, go to my Covid Science blog at covidscienceblog.com

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To read more of this long blog post with many topics, click Read More Below!!

NOTE: Please scroll down to read the other topics in this long blog post on fees, house settling, unusual homes, mortgage origination stats, Covid tips for appraisers, etc.

 

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What is Included in Appraisal Square Footage?

Question: Can it count in the square footage?

Roof detail house

By Ryan Lundquist

Excerpts: Can you include it in the square footage? I get questions like this almost every week. Is it okay to count an accessory dwelling in the living area? What about a pool house? How about a man cave or she shed? Let’s talk about this.

The straight dope: It’s tempting to lump something else in the backyard into the square footage, but that’s not appropriate per ANSI measuring standards. Suppose you have to walk outside of the house into something else that is not directly accessible to the house. In that case, we’re really dealing with something that isn’t considered to be a part of the main house…

To read more, click here

My comments: Written for homeowners, but has some good remarks on square footage, such as “lumped square footage” in MLS. What is Included in Appraisal Square Footage can be tricky and controversial. It can also vary by geographic area.

How accurate is the reported square footage from the tax records in your primary service area?(Opens in a new browser tab)

Marketing and Management Tips for Appraisers

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What is most often overlooked by appraisers?


 

 

 

 

Excerpt: We recently asked our appraisal community, “What’s the ONE thing that is most often overlooked by appraisers?” We received a wide variety of answers ranging from big-picture oversights to specific details. The most common answer we received was “Highest and Best Use.”…

Highest and Best Use (HBU)

This was the top answer, which was written in by about 8% of survey respondents “First question when doing an appraisal is the highest and best use. If there are two very different opinions of value on a property, different HBU is often the reason.”…

Obsolescence

Obsolescence is another item mentioned by multiple survey respondents. Appraisers cited both external obsolescence and functional obsolescence as being frequently overlooked.

External obsolescence for the subject property – When I’m reviewing appraisals, I see this more often than other oversights. When I was performing retrospective reviews for FNMA, their biggest complaint was that appraisers did not point out external obsolescence for the subject and/or its impact on marketability (if there was an impact).”

Functional obsolescence – Appraiser focus has changed over the years as subject functionality has changed.”

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Appraisal Humor

Appraisal business tips

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Value, Accuracy, and Misleading for Appraisers

On Value, Accuracy, and Misleading…and How They are Different From What You Might Think!

By Tim Andersen, MAI

Excerpt: Let’s start this musing by addressing the issues of value, accuracy, and misleading. You might have looked at them differently in the past. Then we’ll tie these in the idea of the value conclusion in an appraisal being right or correct.

State appraisal boards level charges against appraisers. It is very common for appraisers to defend themselves against these charges by insisting their value is “right”. Or, they assert they have properly supported their value conclusion, or something similar. In reality, this argument is utterly irrelevant and carries no weight with the appraisal board.

IRRELEVANT!?

When it comes to value, accuracy, and misleading, the appraiser’s value opinion alone is irrelevant and weightless. This is because TAF has given state appraisal boards specific instructions. Those instructions are that the appraiser’s value conclusion is not to be a part of the board’s investigation. Nor is it to be a part of its deliberations. Therefore, it is not to be part of the appraiser’s defense since it is not part of the charges against the appraiser.

To read more, click here

My comment: Tim is a regular contributor to the paid Appraisal Today. He is The USPAP Expert and helps appraisers stay out of trouble with their state boards!! Tim also has an interesting podcast – link is on the top of the page.

What to Do When Your Appraisal Is Under Review(Opens in a new browser tab)

Appraisal Humor

Appraisal business tips

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Infectious Disease Defined the American Bathroom: Appraisals

Cholera and tuberculosis outbreaks transformed the design and technology of the home bathroom. Will Covid-19 inspire a new wave of hygiene innovation?

Excerpt: Alter predicted that disease-avoidance would rise to the fore of bathroom design a few years ago, when he observed the traumatizing effects of the 2003 SARS outbreak on Toronto, which killed 44 people. But home design in general — and bathroom design in particular — has long been influenced by infectious disease. This isn’t a linear narrative with clear causation, but rather a convergence of advancements in science, infrastructure, plumbing, sanitation and design trends.

The modern bathroom developed alongside outbreaks of tuberculosis, cholera and influenza; its standard fixtures, wallcoverings, floorings, and finishes were implemented, in part, to promote health and hygiene in the home at a time of widespread public health concerns.

To read more, click here

Very unusual bathrooms for appraisers(Opens in a new browser tab)

Appraisal Humor

Appraisal business tips

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Appraiser Recovers From COVID-19

Appraiser/Educator Bryan Reynolds is recovering from COVID-19

I had a bit of a difficult time with this podcast. We like to think we’re invincible, immune, unaffected, but that’s silly. We are, at the end of the day, all vulnerable. This chat with my long time friend and partner, Bryan Reynolds, brought that realization home, in stark reality and made it tangible and personal. Appraiser Recovers From COVID-19.
People, we damn near lost Bryan. Please give this podcast a listen. I’ve posted it here, largely unedited. This podcast is the epitome of authentic.
Hal Humphreys
Partner Appraiser eLearning
The Appraisal Update – Episode 40 | Bryan Reynolds and COVID19
My comment: Listen to this podcast!! I saw the last podcast live on March 26. Hal Humphreys was the moderator, speaking from his front yard. He said that Dave had coronavirus. I am so glad that he is recovered! To watch his webinars, go to https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClb6iDQvzQqj4GOiKSCp8EA

10-20 UPDATE: For lots of Covid analysis and news, go to my new covidscienceblog.com

Covid-19 Residential Appraisers Tips on Staying Safe

Appraisal Humor

Appraisal business tips

A very, very funny appraiser video!

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