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This blog has all my free weekly email newsletters since 2012. Plus other topics. Please note that the original email newsletter subject line has been significantly shortened. To see the original email newsletters, click here to go to the newsletter archives. The newsletter has been sent out weekly since June, 1994. To subscribe to the free email newsletters and receive them on the date they are first issued, go to www.appraisaltoday.com and sign up in the big Yellow Box!!

Looking for a topic? Use Search box on the right side. There are hundreds of posts on this blog, starting in 2012. 

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Posted in: Uncategorized

FHA Handbook 4000.1 Appraisal Changes

FHA Handbook 4000.1 Appraisal Changes

By Dan Bradley

Excerpts: On January 18, 2023, HUD issued an announcement regarding revisions made to Handbook 4000.1. According to the announcement, the revisions included “enhancements and revisions to existing guidelines and various technical edits.”

The most significant of these revisions was the elimination of the requirement to include the 1004MC form as an attachment to the appraisal report.

Changes to the Handbook also include several other minor, but nevertheless meaningful, edits and clarifications to FHA appraisal requirements, including:

Under “Attic Observation Requirements,” a clarification was made regarding the appraiser’s obligation to “safely” access the attic. The language requiring a minimum “head and shoulders” access into the attic was deleted.

Under “Crawl Space Observation Requirements,” significant revisions were made, including removal of a bullet point list of MPR/MPS criteria for the crawl space. Also, language requiring a minimum “head and shoulders” access into the crawl space was deleted.

The changes outlined in the Handbook may be implemented immediately but must be implemented for FHA cases assigned on or after April 18, 2023.

To read more, click here

My comments: Many thanks to McKissock for telling us what we need to know. Includes a link to the “redline” version of 4000.1 so you can skip over most of it. Scroll down to “Updates, Revisions, Notifications” to get the redline versions.

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Revised FHA Handbook 4000.1 effective 9/14/15. Are you ready for the changes? Get the facts!!

Appraisal Business Tips 

Humor for Appraisers

To read more of this long blog post with many topics, click Read More Below!!

NOTE: Please scroll down to read the other topics in this long blog post on unusual homes, mortgage origination stats, etc.

Click here to subscribe to our FREE weekly appraiser email newsletter and get the latest appraisal news!!

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10 homes built between 1682 and 1780

The oldest home (Photo above)

1. 12 Barrell Lane Ext, York, ME

Price: $3,900,000

Year built: 1682

York Harbor: This spacious Dutch gambrel offers waterfront views of a private peninsula.

6 bedrooms, 4 baths, 4,321 square feet, 0.46acre lot

The six-bedroom home boasts 4,321 square feet of updated space. Historic details include three fireplaces, restored hardwood floors, a staircase, and built-in cabinetry. The modern kitchen features wide-board pine floors and lots of windows to soak in the natural light. Enjoy scenic vistas from the front porch or back decks.

To see all 10 homes, click here

My comments: I’m sort of envious of East Coast appraisers with so many old homes. Click on the address at the top of each short description to go to the MLS with many photos and sometimes a video.

“One of the most quoted experts on housing markets, Jonathan Miller of real estate appraisal company Miller Samuel, won an unusually large 30-way bidding war for a Connecticut house built in 1755.” To read about How the ‘real estate whisperer’ won a 30-way bidding war and landed his dream house, Click here

I have read Jonathan’s weekly Housing Notes for many years. To subscribe, click here

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City National Bank To Pay $31M To Settle Redlining Claims

January 16, 2023

Excerpts: DOJ says settlement with LA-based bank is largest in department’s history.

Key Takeaways

City National is the largest bank headquartered in Los Angeles and among the 50 largest U.S. banks.

From 2017 through at least 2020, City National avoided marketing and underwriting mortgages in majority-Black and Hispanic neighborhoods.

Other banks in the county received more than six times as many applications in majority-Black and Hispanic neighborhoods.

City National opened only one branch in a majority-Black and Hispanic neighborhood in the past 20 years.

To read more, click here

My comments: I have yet to see this widely quoted in the news. Quite a contrast to all the references to appraisal “bias” in the news. Hmmm… Banks give a lot of money for political contributions. How much do appraisers contribute? How much extra money do appraisers make for “bias”???

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More layoffs at Reno-based Clear Capital AMC amid ‘seismic shift’ in housing market

Excerpts: Latest news comes after last year’s restructuring when Clear Capital laid off more than a quarter of its global workforce.

In addition to its Reno headquarters, the company also has offices in California and Minnesota.

To read more, click here

My comments: Will more AMCs downsize? The article source above is the local newspaper Reno Gazette-Journal. Keep a very close watch on your unpaid billings! Don’t let an AMC fall behind on your payments. Call, email, text over and over so you get paid. If they go into bankruptcy, employees get paid first. Fee appraisers seldom get anything.

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Thinking about non-lender appraisals but need more detailed information and advice?

I get many emails and calls from appraisers about this topic. I have been writing about non-lender work since I started my monthly newsletter in June 1992, and have done almost all the types of work I write about.

You will learn how lender and non-lender appraisals differ (there are significant differences). Popular topics include how to market to attorneys and get referrals from real estate agents.

Estate/trust appraisals, the most popular for residential appraisers, are included.

The most profitable appraisals are for divorces, where you testify as an expert witness at very high fees. I have done many of these and write about this in detail.

Also included are “niche” markets such as bail bonds, property tax appeals, and many more.

To read more about this topic, plus 2+ years of previous issues, subscribe to the paid Appraisal Today.

If this article helped you get one more non-lender appraisal, it is worth the subscription price!

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If you have any comments or info on any topics, please hit the reply button!! I’m always looking for something new ;>

If you are a paid subscriber and did not get the January 2023 issue emailed on Tuesday, January 3, please email info@appraisaltoday.com, and we will send it to you!! Or hit the reply button. Be sure to put in a comment requesting it.

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Was This Home Overimproved or Underimproved?

By Jamie Owen

Excerpts: The Appraisal of Real Estate, fifteenth edition on page 352, states that “…the relationship between land and improvements and the relationship between a property and its environment must be in balance for a property to achieve its optimum market value. For example, a residential property with a one-car garage in a market that expects similar homes to have a two-car garage (known as an underimprovement) or too many expensive amenities for its location (known as an overimprovement or superadequacy) is out of balance.”

… Buyers who are looking for homes that are not electrified usually do not utilize more conventional forms of transportation such as automobiles. Most buyers interested in a home that has not been electrified also rely on horse and buggy as a common form of transportation. Therefore, having a stable and/or outbuilding might be more valuable than a more traditional garage to prospective buyers of properties that are not electrified.

To read more, click here

My comments: Worth reading. Written for homeowners but is a good “refresher” for appraisers with some unusual examples, such as non-electrified homes. Don’t miss the Fun Video at the end: “The Doodle House” by Mr. Doodle!

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Appraisal Turn Times Show Improvement in 2022

Excerpts: Reggora, an appraisal management software company, has announced its first-ever Appraisal Performance Index, a study to index appraisal operations trends across the mortgage industry.

The year 2022 began with interest rates close to 3%, and then climbed to 7% before retreating in mid-December, and this increase in rates caused mortgage volumes to plummet, creating a unique scenario where the number of loan originations went from too many for appraisers to handle to a manageable number and a reasonable flow of work.

Observations of the Index revealed, the average appraisal fee slowly dropped throughout the 2022 calendar year. The year began with an average fee of $620 per appraisal, and peaked in March at $635, but fell to $592 by November.

To read more, click here

To read the full, detailed and interesting study, “Appraisal Performance Index: 2022 Insights” click here 

My comments: Worth reading. Good graphs on fees, turn time, and revision requests. Read the full report for much more information, including regions and states.

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Gizmos Aplenty: Clever Berkshires Mansion Could Fetch $15.5M

Excerpts: The owners of an architectural marvel in New Marlborough, MA, are hoping to reel in $15.5 million for their extraordinary 300-acre estate. Known as Vergelegen, the 4,273-square-foot 10 bedroom main house built in 2014 has views of the Berkshire Hills and Taconic Mountains.

But the star attraction? That would be the home’s array of manual mechanisms that control some of its finest features.

The design of the 10-bedroom house is the brainchild of its art historian homeowners, along with U.S. architect Tom Kundig, British landscape architect Tom Stuart-Smith, and a Berkshires-based master builder.

Standout details of the industrial-style home include cantilevered decks and entire walls of glass that open up mechanically. While they might look difficult to operate, the hand-crank wheels are very easy to use.

Similar in design, there is a dumbwaiter from the ground floor to the upstairs spaces.

“There are walls of windows that operate on a cog-and-wheel design that allow you to easily open them up completely to the outdoors,” Fields says. When the window walls are ajar, the house mingles indoor and outdoor spaces. “When completely open, the sensation is akin to being in an elegant and comfortable tree fort, hovering above the landscape,” the architect’s website notes of the firm’s trademark gizmo.

To read more and see lots of interesting photos, Click here

Link to MLS with 69 photos click here

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HOW TO USE THE NUMBERS BELOW. Appraisals are ordered after the loan application. These numbers tell you the future for the next few weeks. For more information on how they are compiled, go to www.mba.orgNote: I publish a graph of this data every month in my paid monthly newsletter, Appraisal Today. For more information or get a FREE sample go to www.appraisaltoday.com/order Or call 510-865-8041, MTW, 7 AM to noon, Pacific time.

My comments: Rates are going up and down. Some appraisers are very busy, and others need more work. Varies widely around the country.

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Mortgage applications increased 7.0 percent from one week earlier

Mortgage applications increased 7.0 percent from one week earlier, according to data from the Mortgage Bankers Association’s (MBA) Weekly Mortgage Applications Survey for the week ending January 20, 2023. This week’s results include an adjustment for the observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

The Market Composite Index, a measure of mortgage loan application volume, increased 7.0 percent on a seasonally adjusted basis from one week earlier. On an unadjusted basis, the Index increased 1 percent compared with the previous week. The Refinance Index increased 15 percent from the previous week and was 77 percent lower than the same week one year ago. The seasonally adjusted Purchase Index increased 3 percent from one week earlier. The unadjusted Purchase Index decreased 1 percent compared with the previous week and was 39 percent lower than the same week one year ago.

“Mortgage rates declined for the third straight week, which is good news for potential homebuyers looking ahead to the spring homebuying season. Mortgage rates on most loan types decreased last week and the 30-year fixed rate reached its lowest level since September 2022 at 6.2 percent,” said Joel Kan, MBA’s Vice President and Deputy Chief Economist. “Overall applications increased with both gains in purchase and refinance activity, but purchase applications remained almost 39 percent lower than a year ago. Homebuying activity remains tepid, but if rates continue to fall and home prices cool further, we expect to see potential buyers come back into the market. Many have been waiting for affordability challenges to subside.”

Added Kan, “Despite a 15 percent increase in refinances, they were still 77 percent behind last year’s pace, as rates remained more than two percentage points higher, thus providing very little refinance incentive for most borrowers who are locked into lower rates.”

The refinance share of mortgage activity increased to 31.9 percent of total applications from 31.2 percent the previous week. The adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) share of activity decreased to 6.5 percent of total applications.

The FHA share of total applications decreased to 11.9 percent from 13.0 percent the week prior. The VA share of total applications increased to 13.0 percent from 11.8 percent the week prior. The USDA share of total applications remained unchanged at 0.6 percent from the week prior.

The average contract interest rate for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages with conforming loan balances ($726,200 or less) decreased to 6.20 percent from 6.23 percent, with points increasing to 0.69 from0.67 (including the origination fee) for 80 percent loan-to-value ratio (LTV) loans. The effective rate decreased from last week.

The average contract interest rate for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages with jumbo loan balances (greater than $726,200)decreased to 5.92 percent from 6.08 percent, with points increasing to 0.41 from 0.40 (including the origination fee) for 80 percent LTV loans. The effective rate decreased from last week.

The average contract interest rate for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages backed by the FHA decreased to 6.22 percent from 6.26 percent, with points increasing to 1.10 from 1.05 (including the origination fee) for 80 percent LTV loans. The effective rate decreased from last week.

The average contract interest rate for 15-year fixed-rate mortgages decreased to 5.54 percent from 5.58 percent, with points decreasing to 0.51 from 0.54 (including the origination fee) for 80 percent LTV loans. The effective rate decreased from last week.

The average contract interest rate for 5/1 ARMs increased to 5.44 percent from 5.31 percent, with points increasing to 0.83 from 0.74 (including the origination fee) for 80 percent LTV loans. The effective rate increased from last week.

The survey covers over 75 percent of all U.S. retail residential mortgage applications, and has been conducted weekly since 1990. Respondents include mortgage bankers, commercial banks, and thrifts. Base period and value for all indexes is March 16, 1990=100.

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Ann O’Rourke, MAI, SRA, MBA

Appraiser and Publisher Appraisal Today

1826 Clement Ave. Suite 203 Alameda, CA 94501

Phone 510-865-8041

Email  ann@appraisaltoday.com

 

Posted in: AMCs, appraisal business, bias, FHA, non-lender appraisals

Top Ten Reasons Why It Is Great to be an Appraiser!

Top Ten Reasons Why It Is Great to be an Appraiser!

10. Dazzle your friends with your knowledge of external obsolescence.

9. The wonderful world of rats, bats, and spiders.

8. Be a part of the profession blamed for the collapse of the savings and loan industry.

7. See places in people’s houses that usually require a search warrant to access.

6. Arouse the suspicion of an entire neighborhood when inspecting comparable sales.

5. Chance to really irritate annoying real estate salespeople.

4. Walk around holding a clipboard just like “Skip” down at the Jiffy Lube.

3. Spend hours writing volumes of supporting documentation to justify the market value of a property you already decided on when you pulled into the driveway.

2. See that some people really do hang those black velveteen pictures of Elvis on their living room walls.

1. Be one of a handful of people who know that USPAP is not a medical term.

Many thanks to reader Joe Ibach, MAI, for this great list! He doesn’t know the source…seems like it is one of those email/send/resends now floating around the Internet!

Appraisal Business Tips 

Click here to subscribe to our FREE weekly appraiser email newsletter and get the latest appraisal news!!

To read more of this long blog post with many topics, click Read More Below!!

NOTE: Please scroll down to read the other topics in this long blog post on AMC fees, Real estate forecast, Google Business Profile, unusual homes, mortgage origination stats, etc.

Read more!!

Posted in: AMCs, appraisal business, forecast, humor, real estate market

Appraiser Scam – Be Careful!

Appraiser Scam – Be Careful!

Posted Jan 5 on National Appraisers Forum. This was also posted in the 100% Appraisers group on FaceBook as happening to others.

“Last week, I received a text from “Master Chief Robert Roy” requesting an appraisal for a cash purchase. I thought it was odd that he was addressing himself by his rank as I do work for the VA and no service member has ever done that in my experience. Also my daughter’s boyfriend, a West Point graduate, was visiting at the time and he also thought it was odd too. I looked him up on line and saw that he was a Navy Seal and a public speaker. I addressed him as Sir in our texts out of respect.“

“He requested that I inspect the property 1/5/2023 as the inspector would be there at the same time. My fee was $775 however sent me a $1950 cashier’s check via Fed Ex the next day. He stated that his assistant mistakenly included the inspector’s fee and would I please pay the inspector the $1175 balance. (That seemed high for an inspector….) “

One of the responses:

“Sorry this happened to you. I posted about this about a month ago. Same guy. Because it seemed so odd, I didn’t respond to him and instead called the listing agent directly. He said I was the 4th female appraiser to call him about this in 24 hours. He had reported it all to the police. I never responded to the dude, as it is obviously a scam or worse. When I researched the name he was using, I found that person to be deceased. “

My comments: When appraisers are very slow, it is very hard to turn down an appraisal. Savvy scammers may know about this. Beware!!

1-12-17 Newz .New scam: owners pose as renters, 21 day turn times

Appraisal Business Tips 

Humor for Appraisers

Click here to subscribe to our FREE weekly appraiser email newsletter and get the latest appraisal news!!

To read more of this long blog post with many topics, click Read More Below!!

NOTE: Please scroll down to read the other topics in this long blog post on all cash sales, bad bank, FHFA/Fannie, speaking at real estate agent meetings, unusual homes, mortgage origination stats, etc.

Read more!!

Posted in: appraisal business, Fannie, non-lender appraisals, real estate market

Appraiser Professional Goals

1-6-23 NEWSLETTER

Appraisers Share Their Top Professional Goals for 2023

By: McKissock (Survey)

Excerpts:

  • Maintain my current business (26%)
  • Earn a designation or certification (16%)
  • Grow my business (15%)
  • Prepare for retirement (12%)

“I would like to turn over my appraisal business to my daughter, who is certified.”

Should have retired last year but put it off due to the high amount of requests!”

After 23 years in appraising, which was very beneficial for me and my customers, I’m preparing for retirement.”

  • Achieve a better work-life balance (10%)
  • Other (6%)

To read more, including personal comments from appraisers, click here.

My comments: The post has links to some topics above with many tips. I have recently been writing about many of these topics since the market changed.

I write about non-lender work, staying up when business is down, retirement planning, and more in my monthly newsletter. I will be writing soon about upgrading to Certified General. I have always done both commercial and residential. My business has been much more stable as I can shift between them when the appraisal markets change, especially fees.

What are you planning to do in 2023? Now is the time to learn all the features in your MLS and forms software, upgrade your skills by taking seminars and classes, and more.

The future of residential appraising

Appraisal Business Tips 

Humor for Appraisers

Click here to subscribe to our FREE weekly appraiser email newsletter and get the latest appraisal news!!

To read more of this long blog post with many topics, click Read More Below!!

NOTE: Please scroll down to read the other topics in this long blog post on USPAP and non-traditional appraisals, Non-lender appraisals, reos, tear downs, unusual homes, mortgage origination stats, etc.

Read more!!

Posted in: non-lender appraisals, real estate market, USPAP

VA Required to Encourage Hybrid Appraisals

  • VA Required to Encourage Hybrids – Senate Passes HR 7735

    By Dave Towne December 21, 2022

    Excerpts: The U.S. Senate has announced the passage of HR 7735, the Improving Access to the VA Home Loan Benefit Act of 2022.

    Under the terms of HR 7735, sponsored by Sen. Dan Sullivan and Rep. Mike Bost, the VA will be required to:

    • Issue certification requirements for appraisers;
    • Execute minimum property requirements;
    • Review the process for selecting and reviewing comparable sales;
    • Implement quality control processes;
    • Establish the Assisted Appraisal Processing Program; and
    • Establish the use of waivers or other alternatives to existing appraisal processes.

    This is not yet ‘law,’ but likely will be in the not too distant future. Has passed House and Senate. Needs Biden’s signature.

    To read more, click here

    My comments: Read the appraisers’ comments. The law is not surprising. The mortgage industry has been wanting this for a long time. I still recommend VA to appraisers as they are the only mortgage organization that wants to help the borrower instead of making as much money as possible

Where VA loans are soaring. Are you doing VA appraisals?

Appraisal Business Tips 

Humor for Appraisers

Click here to subscribe to our FREE weekly appraiser email newsletter and get the latest appraisal news!!

To read more of this long blog post with many topics, click Read More Below!!

NOTE: Please scroll down to read the other topics in this long blog post Bad appraisers, 2023 forecast, unusual homes, mortgage origination stats, etc.

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Posted in: appraisal business, bad appraisers, forecast, hybrid appraisals, non-lender appraisals, va

What is a residential complex property?

How to Identify a Residential Complex Property

By: McKissock December 16, 2022

Excerpts: The property to be appraised is atypical

In this case, the property is an outlier, oddball, or not common for the particular area. Of all the characteristics that can make a property complex, physical features are the ones that are most obvious. Some of the key physical features that can make an appraisal assignment complex include:

The form of ownership is atypical

In this case, circumstances involving ownership are uncommon or make the appraisal more complex. For example: The owner doesn’t own property rights on a waterfront property.

The market conditions are atypical

In this case, unique market conditions increase the complexity of the appraisal. For example:

The property is located in an area where there are no other sales.

There is no market for the house; no sales are occurring for some reason (e.g., the property is near a nuclear site cleanup).

Note: the link to the complementary post, “How to Pull Comps on a Complex Property,” is included in this blog post.

To read more, click here

My comments: Worth reading with good tips. I published “Tips for dealing with complex residential appraisals” in the November issue, much longer with many more tips and examples.

Appraisal Business Tips 

Humor for Appraisers

Click here to subscribe to our FREE weekly appraiser email newsletter and get the latest appraisal news!!

To read more of this long blog post with many topics, click Read More Below!!

NOTE: Please scroll down to read the other topics in this long blog post on mortgage rate forecast, Humor, adjustments, George Dell, unusual homes, mortgage origination stats, etc.

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Posted in: adjustments, appraisal how to, george dell, humor

Appraisal Risk and Modernization

Industry Insider Insight on Risk and Modernization

Excerpts: The Collateral Risk Network (CRN) met in Sarasota on December 6th to discuss a variety of issues ranging from appraisal turn times to Fannie Mae’s economic outlook for 2023. Bill Rayburn gave a rousing and lively explanation of exactly what quality means in valuation at a recent meeting. Lenders want a compliant document that allows the loan package to be sold as quickly as possible, while investors want an appraisal that allows for securitization or resale to another downstream buyer.

Appraisers were encouraged to provide convenience as one aspect of quality. His figures show there is a holding cost of $200 per day on an unclosed loan and this hinges on the appraisal which is the last thing in the critical path to closing. He suggested we redefine quality to include a time element.

Joe Minnich, a condo risk consultant, spoke on how loans secured by an individual unit in a condominium project have greater risk than found in typical SFR lending. Lenders must address the various layers of risk to ensure that the loan is of saleable quality and the likelihood the borrower can/will repay the loan.

To read more, click here

My comments: Bill Rayburn, Chairman, and CEO at mTrade, is an excellent speaker and very savvy. I have known him for many years. FYI, CRN (Collateral Risk Network) was set up for AMCs and lenders. It was “closed” to appraisers for a while but is open now. Worth attending.

Fannie New Appraisal Form Modernization

Appraisal Business Tips 

Humor for Appraisers

Click here to subscribe to our FREE weekly appraiser email newsletter and get the latest appraisal news!!

To read more of this long blog post with many topics, click Read More Below!!

NOTE: Please scroll down to read the other topics in this long blog post on Fannie December newsletter, estate appraisals real estate market, unusual homes, mortgage origination stats, etc.

Read more!!

Posted in: appraisal business, Fannie, real estate market

How to Reduce Appraisal Revision Requests

How to Reduce Appraisal Revision Requests

By Clear Capital November 14, 2022

Excerpts:

To cut down on appraisal revision requests, it is important to keep these best practices in mind:

Communicate in a timely manner

Address the request thoroughly and professionally. Add additional commentary where appropriate.

Ask questions. If you disagree with the request for appraisal submissions or have concerns or need clarification, please reach out for clarification.

1. Explain ‘How’, not ‘Why’ in the appraisal report

The most common frustrations arise when the appraiser focuses more on the type of adjustments made while the reader would look for the ‘how’ in the appraisal report. For example, if a positive or negative adjustment was applied in the report, the reader wants to know how the adjustment was determined.

“How did you determine that the subject comparable was inferior or superior in condition? Don’t leave the ‘how’ part out while applying adjustments. Be sure to address those questions; it will certainly help you in the long run.” says Ken Folven, Senior Director, Appraisal Quality Assurance at Clear Capital

2. Reduce lengthy commentary

In some cases, appraisers provide lengthy boilerplate commentary in an attempt to avoid a revision request. This strategy often backfires because parties involved in the lending process cannot find the specific information they are looking for in the report. Inconsistent commentary can result in common requests for revision.

Prior to submission, read the letter of engagement in detail, which highlights the customer-specific information, and make sure to include all required information in your report. Organize your commentary and explain your comparable selection process briefly.

“I always recommend organizing commentary by adjustment rather than by comparable and make it a habit to review the pre-delivery rules,” says Khan.

Derek Mitchell, a California-based Senior Appraiser at Clear Capital, has a different approach: “I use a lot of characteristic-based comments as opposed to comparable-based comments because it cuts down on the amount of writing that I have to do and the amount of reading the reviewer has to do,” Mitchell says. “It tends to get redundant when you’re just talking about different comparables but the same characteristics.”

In addition, staying up-to-date with Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP), Federal Housing Administration (FHA), and GSE guidelines and industry requirements also goes a long way in drafting error-free reports that would otherwise create unnecessary revision requests.

To read more, click here

My comments: Good practical tips. We all hate revisions unless maybe it was because we forgot to put the value in. I did this sometimes in appraisals for a local bank ;> Your clients hate them also. They take appraisers too much time and can sometimes make you very upset, which interrupts your workflow.

What Causes Appraisal Revisions?

Appraisal Business Tips 

Humor for Appraisers

Click here to subscribe to our FREE weekly appraiser email newsletter and get the latest appraisal news!!

To read more of this long blog post with many topics, click Read More Below!!

NOTE: Please scroll down to read the other topics in this long blog post on retirement, classes, adjustments, real estate market, unusual homes, mortgage origination stats, etc.

Click here to subscribe to our FREE weekly appraiser email newsletter and get the latest appraisal news!!

Read more!!

Posted in: adjustments, appraisal, appraisal classes, appraisal how to, real estate market, retirement

NAR: Appraisal License Equivalency Credit for RE Agents?

NAR Urges Appraisal Foundation To Establish Equivalency Credit for Education and Experience

Excerpts: The AQB previously considered the option of allowing parallel professional non-appraisal experience. In a July 9, 2015, Concept Paper – Alternate Track to the Experience Requirements in the Real Property Appraiser Qualification Criteria, the AQB asked: “Are there practical alternatives for some (or all) of the appraisal experience requirements to include non-appraisal experience?”

The National Association of REALTORS® believes there are alternatives to some of the experience requirements that the AQB should consider.

NAR sent a letter to the Appraisal urging the Appraisal Foundation (TAF) to review the experience and education of workers in parallel professions and consider it for potential credit to satisfy the accreditation requirements of appraiser licensing.

Excerpts from the letter:

… including, but not limited to, experience in real estate market analysis and real estate brokerage, including:

• Evaluating and pricing residential real estate

• Counseling buyers, sellers, owners, and tenants on inspections and remediations, improvements, and the appraisal process

• Counseling buyers, sellers, owners, and tenants about listing and offering prices, and market rent

• Completing broker price opinions and Competitive Market Analyses

• Completing Evaluations in compliance with the Interagency Appraisal and Evaluation Guidelines

• Compliance with Fair Housing laws, rules, and regulations

• Compliance with the Equal Credit Opportunity Act

To read the letter (PDF), click here

My comments: Real estate agents and brokers are salespersons. They provide CMAs, etc., which can relate to valuation. I don’t know if Realtors can be re-trained to see value rather than price. I speak with a lot of Realtors and many are not oriented the same as appraisers.

Over the years, I observed that successful real estate agents seldom switched to the much less profitable appraisal side. Persons who started in sales but were not very good sometimes went into appraising.

On the other side, appraisal provides excellent experience for real estate agents. I know some successful agents who were trained as appraisers and appraised for awhile. There are also agents/brokers who are licensed appraisers and do both. Appraisers with real estate sales experience know real estate from the “inside” by interacting with buyers and sellers. Appraisers are real estate reporters.

Does NAR want to allow some appraisal experience and education instead of 100% sales experience and more than one appraisal class for a broker’s license? What about a salesperson license?

I have been a licensed real estate broker since 1986. I got it mostly for MLS access and have only done one sale, representing the buyer. At that time, no sales experience was required for a broker’s license, only a 4-year degree. I am familiar with the current experience requirements for a broker’s license. Can appraisal experience count for some of these experience requirements? It should go both ways.

NAR Appraisal Survey 2022

Appraisal Business Tips 

Humor for Appraisers

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To read more of this long blog post with many topics, click Read More Below!!

NOTE: Please scroll down to read the other topics in this long blog post on George Harrison passed, Appraisal business, marketingunusual homes, mortgage origination stats, etc.

Read more!!

Posted in: appraisal business, appraisal classes, marketing

More Crazy Appraiser Stories!

More Crazy Appraisal Stories!

Excerpt:

Restraining Orders & Appraisals – Never a Great Mix

Eric VanderWaal

The majority of my appraisal work is on divorces and estates, both of which have their fair share of crazy stories.

I was appraising a home for a divorce several years ago. The husband had contacted me for the appraisal, but it was the wife who was living in the home. We met at 9:30 am, which was an odd time that he requested. When I arrived at the home, he said that she wasn’t home and had locked all the doors, so he called a locksmith to come to open the back door. The locksmith arrived shortly and started to work on the backdoor. The husband said that his wife was aware of the appraisal appointment and should have left the home unlocked.

I started on the outside and about ten minutes later, a woman comes to the backyard where the husband, myself, and the locksmith were and starts yelling at the husband about him not being allowed to be there. I thought it was the wife, but it turned out to be a neighbor. The wife was at an appointment which is why, I figured out, that he wanted the appointment at 9:30 am rather than 10:00 am. After several minutes of the husband and neighbor yelling at each other, the locksmith got the back door open. The neighbor left and we went inside…

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My comments: We all have these stories ;> Divorce is the best non-lender option for residential appraisers. Very little competent competition and very high fees for expert witness testimony.

You will probably be going up against an MAI. Your attorney says to the MAI: How many house appraisals have you done this year? Answer: 4. Your answer: much more than 4! Your attorney is happy at winning the case, and you get lots more divorce work.

I will be writing about this in an upcoming issue of the monthly Appraisal Today, with lots of marketing and expert witness tips.

Many thanks to Appraisal Buzz for the image above. My favorite appraiser image ;>

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